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15 Tips for Your Medical School Personal Statement

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And it was here that I began to take seriously the possibility of becoming a pediatric surgeon. My interest was sparked even more when, as an undergraduate, I was asked to assist in a study one of my professors was conducting on how children experience and process fear and the prospect of death.

This professor was not in the medical field; rather, her background is in cultural anthropology. I was very honored to be part of this project at such an early stage of my career. During the study, we discovered that children face death in extremely different ways than adults do.

We concluded our study by asking whether and to what extent this discovery should impact the type of care given to children in contrast to adults.

I am eager to continue this sort of research as I pursue my medical career. The intersection of medicine, psychology, and socialization or culture in this case, the social variables differentiating adults from children is quite fascinating and is a field that is in need of better research. Although much headway has been made in this area in the past twenty or so years, I feel there is a still a tendency in medicine to treat diseases the same way no matter who the patient is.

We are slowly learning that procedures and drugs are not always universally effective. Not only must we alter our care of patients depending upon these cultural and social factors, we may also need to alter our entire emotional and psychological approach to them as well.

This is the type of extraordinary care that I received as a child—care that seemed to approach my injuries with a much larger and deeper picture than that which pure medicine cannot offer—and it is this sort of care I want to provide my future patients. I turned what might have been a debilitating event in my life—a devastating car accident—into the inspiration that has shaped my life since.

I am driven and passionate. And while I know that the pediatric surgery program at Johns Hopkins will likely be the second biggest challenge I will face in my life, I know that I am up for it. I will be a doctor. If you had told me ten years ago that I would be writing this essay and planning for yet another ten years into the future, part of me would have been surprised.

I am a planner and a maker of to-do lists, and it has always been my plan to follow in the steps of my father and become a physician. This plan was derailed when I was called to active duty to serve in Iraq as part of the War on Terror. I joined the National Guard before graduating high school and continued my service when I began college. My goal was to receive training that would be valuable for my future medical career, as I was working in the field of emergency health care.

It was also a way to help me pay for college. When I was called to active duty in Iraq for my first deployment, I was forced to withdraw from school, and my deployment was subsequently extended. I spent a total of 24 months deployed overseas, where I provided in-the-field medical support to our combat troops. While the experience was invaluable not only in terms of my future medical career but also in terms of developing leadership and creative thinking skills, it put my undergraduate studies on hold for over two years.

Consequently, my carefully-planned journey towards medical school and a medical career was thrown off course. Eventually, I returned to school. Despite my best efforts to graduate within two years, it took me another three years, as I suffered greatly from post-traumatic stress disorder following my time in Iraq. I considered abandoning my dream of becoming a physician altogether, since I was several years behind my peers with whom I had taken biology and chemistry classes before my deployment.

Thanks to the unceasing encouragement of my academic advisor, who even stayed in contact with me when I was overseas, I gathered my strength and courage and began studying for the MCAT. I can describe my new ten-year plan, but I will do so with both optimism and also caution, knowing that I will inevitably face unforeseen complications and will need to adapt appropriately. One of the many insights I gained as a member of the National Guard and by serving in war-time was the incredible creativity medical specialists in the Armed Forces employ to deliver health care services to our wounded soldiers on the ground.

I was part of a team that was saving lives under incredibly difficult circumstances—sometimes while under heavy fire and with only the most basic of resources. I am now interested in how I can use these skills to deliver health care in similar circumstances where basic medical infrastructure is lacking. As I learned from my father, who worked with Doctors Without Borders for a number of years, there is quite a bit in common between my field of knowledge from the military and working in post-conflict zones.

I feel I have a unique experience from which to draw as I embark on my medical school journey, experiences that can be applied both here and abroad. I hope to conduct research in the field of health care infrastructure and work with government agencies and legislators to find creative solutions to improving access to emergency facilities in currently underserved areas of the United States, with an aim towards providing comprehensive policy reports and recommendations on how the US can once again be the world leader in health outcomes.

While the problems inherent in our health care system are not one-dimensional and require a dynamic approach, one of the solutions as I see it is to think less in terms of state-of-the-art facilities and more in terms of access to primary care. Much of the care that I provide as a first responder and volunteer is extremely effective and also relatively cheap.

More money is always helpful when facing a complex social and political problem, but we must think of solutions above and beyond more money and more taxes.

Of course, my policy interests do not replace my passion for helping others and delivering emergency medicine.

As a doctor, I hope to continue serving in areas of the country that, for one reason or another, are lagging behind in basic health care infrastructure. Recommendation letters, personal statements, and admission interviews are ways to showcase your talents and convince the school that you have what it takes.

Letters of recommendation are typically sent in the latter part of the application process with Secondary Applications. Admissions committees are generally very specific about from whom they want to receive letters on your behalf.

You should do everything you can to give the medical schools exactly the kind of letters they have requested. Either an original letter written by your undergraduate premedical committee on your behalf, or a summary of excerpts of comments made by individuals who have submitted letters at your request on your behalf. Alternatively, you will be asked to submit two or three individual letters of recommendation, of which at least one or two must come from senior science faculty.

A letter written by a teaching assistant usually carries less weight. However, letters cosigned by both the teaching assistant and professor are generally acceptable. In addition to the recommendations from science faculty, most medical schools request a letter from a humanities or social science professor, especially for non-science majors.

You may also be asked to submit a letter by someone familiar with your clinical experience, research, or work history. Generally, it is permissible to send supplemental letters of recommendation in addition to the required letters. But note, these will be additional letters, not letters in substitution of those requested. As a rule, you should never send more than twice the number of letters requested.

Additionally, remember that more letters is not necessarily better. Understand it this way: This means you need to get to know your professors or more importantly, you need to give your professors an opportunity to get to know you. Go to office hours; become a teaching assistant; volunteer to work in their lab; take them to lunch! Whatever it takes so that when the time comes, they will be able to write you a personal letter of recommendation. If the person hesitates in any way, look elsewhere.

Although this may be embarrassing, it will hurt you a lot more in the long run to have someone write you a lukewarm or unenthusiastic letter of recommendation.

Remember, schools fully expect these letters to be glowing endorsements. Once you have garnered a positive response, be sure to provide your recommender with a resume to provide a more complete picture of you as a person. If you have a strong academic record, you may want to include a copy of your transcript to showcase your academic prowess and consistency. Your Personal Statement and any articles or papers which you think may be helpful should also be offered.

Finally, always provide the writer with clear directions for electronic or hard-copy submission of the letter to the appropriate school s. You should provide addressed and stamped envelopes when needed. Pre-meds who procrastinate will be left scrambling to get recommendations. Professors and teaching assistants can become overwhelmed with requests. You can imagine the potential quality of these letters.

You must give at least one month for your letter writers to write and submit the letters. Keep track of the status of your letters. As the deadlines approach, call and check on their progress. They want to know why you want to enter the medical profession and this is your chance to tell them as clearly and compellingly as you can. If you plan on submitting your application through AMCAS, the length of your personal statement should be characters, which should be ample space to succinctly set yourself apart from other applicants.

You can explain why you really want to pursue medical graduate work and the career path it will enable you to follow. Your essay also enables you to explain things like weaknesses or gaps in an otherwise commendable record.

How to Write a Personal Statement for Medical School

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Applying to medical school is a long stressful process, here are some sample medical school essays to help you get started. Applying to medical school is a long stressful process, here are some sample medical school essays to help you get started. If you had told me ten years ago that I would be writing this essay and planning for yet.

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Review these sample med school essays to stimulate your authentic creativity and to see what a winning medical school application essay looks like.

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Medical school essays writing is one of the processes of applying to schools in the medical area. We will tell you how to create a paper that will really work. How To Write a Personal Statement for Medical School. Now that we’ve gotten all the organizational matters out of the way, it’s time to start writing. Follow these personal statement tips to get the admission committee absorbed into your work and see you as a potential candidate: We are an Essay Writing Service with professional writers.