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Diversity at Work

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❶Respondents in this canvassing overwhelmingly said yes, anticipating that improvements in such education would continue.

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By using Canadian credential assessment services, employers are able to increase their familiarity and comfort level with international credentials.

If it is unclear how international qualifications compare to Canadian credentials, assessments can be based on other criteria. For regulated occupations, state clearly the licensing or certification required by law. In some circumstances, it may be possible to hire at a lower level of responsibility and help the candidate obtain the required licensing while on the job. If so, this should be stated in job postings. For non-regulated occupations, consider voluntary certification that may apply.

If candidates who have this certification are preferred, this should be stated in job postings. For more information about foreign credential assessments, a fact sheet has been developed by the Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials. In Canada, provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the assessment and recognition of foreign credentials.

These agencies can help assess foreign credentials such as certificates, diplomas and degrees and how they compare to Canadian standards. Assistance is offered through these agencies or potential employees can be asked to have their credentials assessed as part of the application process. For more information on hiring newcomers to Canada, including the assessment and selection of internationally trained workers, visit the Foreign Credentials Referral Office.

Language as a real and as a perceived barrier Strong language skills are important to most nonprofit employers because of the public nature of their daily work. Organizations need to assess the language skills required to perform each specific job, as not all jobs have the same requirements.

There are several programs and services available to help immigrants improve and assess their language skills. For more information, please visit the Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks. While the presence of an accent does not indicate language proficiency, it can impact intelligibility. Intelligibility can be improved with practice and coaching. Employers who provide direct services to a culturally and linguistically diverse audience are enormously benefitted by staff with additional language knowledge.

As resource constraints make it difficult for many nonprofits to provide support for language training, employers may need to be creative about the support they provide. While private language instruction may be out of the question, less costly options such as on-line language learning tools, local conversation circles and language exchanges may be available.

Rather than paying for language classes, organizations may prefer to provide time off for studying or meeting with an internal language coach. This is also an opportunity for internal skills exchange or peer mentoring.

It may also be possible to match a new employee in need of improved language skills but in possession of excellent technical skills with an employee who has strong language proficiency but lacks technical abilities. The guide addresses common issues such as languages skills assessment, foreign credentials and work experience; working with cultural differences; and preparing the workplace.

Hiring and Retaining Internationally Trained Workers This website provides links to guides and resources to assist employers in hiring and retaining internationally trained workers. Resources are identified for multiple provinces. A Guidebook for Building an Immigrant Workforce in the Nonprofit Sector Created by the Calgary Chamber of Voluntary Organizations, the goal of this guidebook is to help nonprofit employers develop an inclusion strategy that will enable them to attract, recruit and retain the best qualified candidates.

This guidebook is a practical tool that is employer-focused. It acknowledges the unique challenges and strengths of the nonprofit sector and is part of a long-term change initiative of focus on developing awareness, attitudes and practices for the creation of culturally competent, inclusive and respectful nonprofits.

Respondents see a new education and training ecosystem emerging in which some job preparation functions are performed by formal educational institutions in fairly traditional classroom settings, some elements are offered online, some are created by for-profit firms, some are free, some exploit augmented and virtual reality elements and gaming sensibilities, and a lot of real-time learning takes place in formats that job seekers pursue on their own.

A considerable number of respondents to this canvassing focused on the likelihood that the best education programs will teach people how to be lifelong learners. Accordingly, some say alternative credentialing mechanisms will arise to assess and vouch for the skills people acquire along the way. A focus on nurturing unique human skills that artificial intelligence AI and machines seem unable to replicate: Many of these experts discussed in their responses the human talents they believe machines and automation may not be able to duplicate, noting that these should be the skills developed and nurtured by education and training programs to prepare people to work successfully alongside AI.

These respondents suggest that workers of the future will learn to deeply cultivate and exploit creativity, collaborative activity, abstract and systems thinking, complex communication, and the ability to thrive in diverse environments. One such comment came from Simon Gottschalk , a professor in the department of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas: Still others spoke of more practical needs that could help workers in the medium term — to work with data and algorithms, to implement 3-D modeling and work with 3-D printers, or to implement the newly emerging capabilities in artificial intelligence and augmented and virtual reality.

About a third of respondents expressed no confidence in training and education evolving quickly enough to match demands by Some of the bleakest answers came from some of the most respected technology analysts.

They are also struggling with basic issues like identification of individuals taking the courses. Several respondents argued that job training is not a primary concern at a time when accelerating change in market economies is creating massive economic divides that seem likely to leave many people behind.

Most participants in this canvassing wrote detailed elaborations explaining their positions, though they were allowed to respond anonymously. Their well-considered comments provide insights about hopeful and concerning trends. These findings do not represent all possible points of view, but they do reveal a wide range of striking observations.

Respondents collectively articulated five major themes that are introduced and briefly explained in the page section below and then expanded upon in more-detailed sections. Some responses are lightly edited for style or due to length. The following section presents a brief overview of the most evident themes extracted from the written responses, including a small selection of representative quotes supporting each point.

These experts envision that the next decade will bring a more widely diversified world of education and training options in which various entities design and deliver different services to those who seek to learn. They expect that some innovation will be aimed at emphasizing the development of human talents that machines cannot match and at helping humans partner with technology.

They say some parts of the ecosystem will concentrate on delivering real-time learning to workers, often in formats that are self-taught. Commonly occurring ideas among the responses in this category are collected below under headings reflecting subthemes.

Educators have always found new ways of training the next generation of students for the jobs of the future, and this generation will be no different. College education which will still favor multi-year, residential education will need to be more focused on teaching students to be lifelong learners, followed by more online content, in situ training, and other such [elements] to increase skills in a rapidly changing information world.

As automation puts increasing numbers of low- and middle-skill workers out of work, these models will also provide for certifications and training needs to function in an increasingly automated service sector.

We will also see what might be called on-demand or on-the-job kind of training programs. We kind of have to, as with continued automation, we will need to retrain a large portion of the workforce.

I strongly believe employers will subscribe to this idea wholeheartedly; it increases the overall education of their workforce, which benefits their bottom line. Nevertheless, I am a big believer in the college experience, which I see as a way to learn what you are all about, as a person and in your field of study. The confidence in your own self and your abilities cannot be learned in a short course.

It takes life experience, or four years at a tough college. At a good college, you are challenged to be your best — this is very resource-intensive and cannot be scaled at this time. Our established systems of job training, primarily community colleges and state universities, will continue to play a crucial role, though catastrophically declining public support for these institutions will raise serious challenges.

One potential future would be for those universities to abandon the idea that they have faculty teaching their own courses and instead consist entirely of a cadre of less well paid teaching assistants who provide support for the students who are taking courses online.

A few respondents said already established institutions cannot be as fully successful as new initiatives. They take too long to teach impractical skills and knowledge not connected to the real world, and when they try to tackle critical thinking for a longer time scale, they mostly fail. The sprouts of the next generation of learning tools are already visible. Within the decade, the new shoots will overtake the wilting vines, and we will see all sorts of new initiatives, mostly outside these schooling, academic and training institutions, which are mostly beyond repair.

People will shift to them because they work, because they are far less expensive and because they are always available. In the hopefully near future, we will not segregate schooling from work and real-world thinking and development. And, again, the experience of being a student, now confined to grade school, secondary school and university, will expand to include workers, those looking for work, and those who want or need to retrain — as well as what we now think of as conventional education.

Via simulation, gaming, digital presentations — combined with hands-on, real-world experience — learning and re-education will move out of books and into the world. The more likely enhancement will be to take digital enhancements out into the world — again, breaking down the walls of the classroom and school — to inform and enhance experience. Some respondents expressed confidence in the best of current online education and training options, saying online course options are cost-effective, evolving for the better, and game-changing because they are globally accessible.

Already, today there are quite effective online training and education systems, but they are not being implemented to their full potential. These applications will become more widely used with familiarity that is gained during the next decade.

Also, populations will be more tech-savvy and be able to make use of these systems with greater personal ease. In addition, the development of virtual reality, AI assistants and other technological advances will add to the effectiveness of these systems.

There will be a greater need for such systems as the needs for new expertise in the workforce [increase] and the capacity of traditional education systems proves that it is not capable of meeting the need in a cost-effective manner. These career changes will require retooling, training and education. The adult learners will not be able to visit physical campuses to access this learning; they will learn online. I anticipate the further development and distribution of holoportation technologies such as those developed by Microsoft using HoloLens for real-time, three-dimensional augmented reality.

These teaching tools will enable highly sophisticated interactions and engagement with students at a distance. They will further fuel the scaling of learning to reach even more massive online classes. As these tools evolve over the next decade, the academics we work with expect to see radical change in training and workforce development, which will roll into although probably against a longer timeline more traditional institutions of higher learning.

Many respondents said real-world, campus-based higher education will continue to thrive during the next decade. They said a residential university education helps build intangible skills that are not replicable online and thus deepens the skills base of those who can afford to pay for such an education, but they expect that job-specific training will be managed by employers on the job and via novel approaches.

The most important skills to have in life are gained through interpersonal experiences and the liberal arts. Traditional four-year and graduate programs will better prepare people for jobs in the future, as such an education gives people a general understanding and knowledge about their field, and here people learn how to approach new things, ask questions and find answers, deal with new situations, etc. Special skills for a particular job will be learned on the job. These skills are imperative to focus on, as the future is in danger of losing these skillsets from the workforce.

Many people have gained these skills throughout history without any kind of formal schooling, but with the growing emphasis on virtual and digital mediums of production, education and commerce, people will have less and less exposure to other humans in person and other human perspectives. But this does not mean that alternative means and paths of learning and accreditation would not be useful as … complementary to the traditional system that has limitations as well.

Will training for skills most important in the jobs of the future work well in large-scale settings by ? Respondents in this canvassing overwhelmingly said yes, anticipating that improvements in such education would continue.

However, many believe the most vital skills are not easy to teach, learn or evaluate in any education or training setting available today. These skills, interestingly, are the skills specific to human beings that machines and robots cannot do … Tiffany Shlain.

There will be an increasing economic incentive to develop mass training that better unlocks this value. Functions requiring emotional intelligence, empathy, compassion, and creative judgment and discernment will expand and be increasingly valued in our culture. These skills, interestingly, are the skills specific to human beings that machines and robots cannot do, and you can be taught to strengthen these skills through education.

I look forward to seeing innovative live and online programs that can teach these at scale. A mindset of persistence and the necessary passion to succeed are also critical. Some who are pessimistic about the future of human work due to advances in capable AI and robotics mocked the current push in the U.

An anonymous program director for a major U. The jobs of the future will not need large numbers of workers with a fixed set of skills — most things that we can train large numbers of workers for, we will also be able to train computers to do better. Among the many other skills mentioned were: This will include open, online learning experiences e.

We will identify opportunities to build a digital version of the apprenticeship learning models that have existed in the past. Alternative credentials and digital badges will provide more granular opportunities to document and archive learning over time from traditional and nontraditional learning sources. Through evolving technologies e.

You may get a degree in computer software development, but the truth is that you still need to be taught how to write software for, say, the mortgage company or insurance company that hires you.

The key to the future will be flexibility and personal motivation to learn and tinker with new things. Some predict that many more workers will begin using online and app-based learning systems. Employers will accept these more as they prove probative. And online learning will be more prevalent, even as an adjunct to formal classroom learning. New industries such as green energy and telemedicine will increase new employment opportunities.

Despite all of these measures, the loss of jobs from artificial intelligence and robotics will exceed any retraining program, at least in the short run. Online and credentialing systems are more transparent and do a better job on delivering skills.

People with new types of credentialing systems are seen as more qualified than traditional four-year and graduate programs. Some respondents hope to see change.

Schools today turn out widget makers who can make widgets all the same. They are built on producing single right answers rather than creative solutions. The unfortunate reality is that many HR departments still post job listings saying degrees and certifications are required, as a way of screening candidates.

Thus, the educational and training programs of the future will become in their best incarnations sophisticated combinations of classroom and hands-on training programs.

The specific models will necessarily be responding to individual industry requirements. They are built on an outmoded attention economy: Pay us for 45 hours of your attention and we will certify your knowledge. I believe that many — not all — areas of instruction should shift to competency-based education in which the outcomes needed are made clear and students are given multiple paths to achieve those outcomes, and they are certified not based on tests and grades but instead on portfolios of their work demonstrating their knowledge.

Some even say the future of jobs for humans is so baleful that capitalism may fail as an economic system. The next themes and subthemes examine these responses. A large share of respondents predicted that online formats for knowledge transfer will not advance significantly in the next decade. Interestingly, being able to adapt and respond to looming challenges was seen by nearly everyone in this canvassing as one of the most highly prized future capabilities; these respondents especially agree that it is important, and they say that our human institutions — government, business, education — are not adapting efficiently and are letting us down.

Many of them say that current K or K education programs are incapable of making adjustments within the next decade to serve the shifting needs of future jobs markets. Among the other reasons listed by people who do not expect these kinds of transformative advances in job creation and job skill upgrading:.

Following are representative statements tied to these points and more from all respondents. Traditional models train people to equate what they do with who they are i. Learning takes time and practice, which means it requires money, lots of money, to significantly change the skill set of a large cohort. Look for organizations specific to your field as well as general business organizations in your community.

Consider everyone you meet as a potential business contact or referral for employees. Even business contacts at competing companies may benefit you. If another company in the same field must reduce its workforce, you have a connection to those employees who lose their jobs. Your presentation when you meet potential job candidates gives you an opportunity to set your company apart. If word gets out about your different approach to recruiting and approaching job candidates, your company may receive even more inquiries from job seekers.

Showcase the details that make your company different from other potential employers. Creating a positive workplace culture that values risk-taking and ownership in the intellectual process gives you a bragging point during your recruitment presentations. Consider adding perks like tuition reimbursement that will attract candidates. Your current employees hold the potential for generating new leads for job openings.

Build a referral program that appeals to your employees so they are more likely refer their acquaintances.

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Creating a positive workplace culture that values risk-taking and ownership in the intellectual process gives you a bragging point during your recruitment presentations.

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